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Posts Tagged ‘Mississippi Gulf Coast’

Master Naturalist John Lipscomb reports today, June 4, 2010, from the South Mississippi Gulf Coast Blue Bird Trail in Long Beach, that:

“We have had lots of rain during the past several days, and the north part of the property is flooded, making it necessary for me to get my waders out to check the boxes. The birdies are making up for the late start this season, with lots of new eggs this week.”

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Blue Bird pair on Box #4, during the 2009 season.

Here are the Blue Bird Trail Survey results for Week #14 – June 4, 2010:

Box #1 – 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 1 Blue Bird egg.

Box #2 – 5 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: – 5 Blue Bird eggs.

Box #3 – 3 Blue Bird babies flew from the nest. *First babies ever to fly from this box since Trail founded in 2008. – Last week: 3 Blue Bird babies.

Box #4 – 5 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: – 2 Blue Bird eggs.

Box #5 – No activity. – Last week: – No activity.

Box #6 – 5 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 2 blue bird eggs.

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Because of heavy rains received during the past several days on the Long Beach Blue Bird Trail, the north part of the Trail had quite a bit of water, much like it did in this 2009 file image.

Box #7 – 5 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 3 blue bird eggs.

Box #8 – 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: New nest built.

Box #9 – Nest built. – Last week: Nest built.

Box #10 – Some straw in box. – Last week: Some straw in box.

Box #11 – Nest built.- Last week: Nest built.

Box #12 – 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 4 Blue Bird eggs.

Box #13 – No activity. – Last week: No activity.

2010 Season Totals: 36 blue bird babies have flown the nest so far; currently in nesting boxes: 32 blue bird eggs.

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Hello again fellow Blue Bird enthusiasts, and Welcome to Week #18 of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Blue Bird Trail Survey, on the campus of the South Mississippi Regional Center, in Long Beach.

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Juvenile Blue Birds from the first hatch of the 2009 Season.

It has been yet another very hot week here on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, but several of the Blue Bird pairs are still producing eggs. 5 new eggs were laid during the past week, bringing the total number of eggs in the nesting boxes to 17. There are no Blue Bird babies currently in the boxes.

Commenting on the Blue Bird Trail Survey this afternoon, Master Naturalist Buddy John, the founder of the Long Beach Blue Bird Trail, had several things to say: “It’s scorching, it’s no fun checking boxes this time of year. I’m very happy with what we’re doing. We’ve got 10 more birds that have flown this year already, than last year, and we have 17 eggs still in the nesting boxes. So, I think we could reasonably push 70 new birds this summer. That’s an increase of 25 from last year. So, I’m happy. I think we’ve done more than we have expected.”

Here are Survey Totals this 2009 Season so far:

86 eggs laid: 9 have been sterile, 4 lost to a predator.

55 babies have flown the nest. – Last Year: 36 babies had flown the nest as of Week #18. Last Year Total Blue Bird babies flying from the nesting boxes: 45.

17 eggs in nesting boxes currently.

0 babies in nesting boxes currently.

Here are the results of Friday’s Blue Bird Trail Survey of the individual nesting boxes, on Friday morning, July 3, 2009:

Nesting Box #1 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: 3 Blue Bird babies flew the nest, 1 Blue Bird egg missing.

Nesting Box #2 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: 3 Blue Bird babies flew the nest, 1 Blue Bird egg missing.

Nesting Box #3 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #4 – 5 Blue Bird eggs. – Last Week: New nest built, 1 Blue Bird egg.

Nesting Box #5 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #6 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – 4 Blue Bird babies flew the nest.

Nesting Box #7 – 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last Week: New nest built, 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Third Clutch.

Nesting Box #8 – 4 Blue Bird eggs. – 4 Blue Bird eggs – Third Clutch.

Nesting Box #9 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #10 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #11 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #12 – 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last Week: 3 Blue Bird eggs – Third Clutch.

Nesting Box #13 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

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In other breaking news along the Blue Bird Trail this week, our friend, Master Naturalist Andrea K. retired on Wednesday, after 25 years of service on the campus of the SMRC. Her presence and contributions to our clients and staff, will be (are) sorely missed. Enjoy your retirement, Andrea!

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Master Naturalist Andrea K., of Hummingbird Trapping fame, (see the little hummer in the white mesh bag?) a staunch supporter of the Blue Bird Trail, and birding, in general, and more recently as Director of Interdisciplinary Programs at the SMRC, has retired this week after 25 years of dedicated service.

Your author will join Master Naturalist Buddy John and his two weekend guests, and Master Naturalist Andrea, and spouse, Ralph, of recent sky diving fame, tomorrow morning to attend the Annual Bay St. Louis Crab Fest, across the bay. That will be a real treat!

How hot has it been here? After a high of 96 earlier this afternoon, at 10:07pm here, it is 86 and clear.

Have a great Holiday weekend!

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Welcome to Week #16 of the 2009 Mississippi Gulf Coast Blue Bird Trail Survey, on the campus of the South Mississippi Regional Center in Long Beach.

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These three large Blue Bird babies will fly from their nesting box any day now.

In a word, things along the Blue Bird Trail this week, were: HOT! The daily average high temperature this week hovered around 95-96 degrees. This is mid-June, not August. What the heck?

I had wondered if this extremely hot weather we are currently experiencing, might slow down or temporarily stop mating season activity among the Blue Birds here on the Trail. Data from today’s Trail Survey, however, doesn’t support that hypothesis, as we found 3 new Blue Bird nests in the nesting boxes, one with a new egg in it. Looks like the pairs are still mating and producing eggs.

Master Naturalist Buddy John expressed a measure of satisfaction today, with the results of the 2009 Blue Bird mating season, after tallying the Survey data, he noted enthusiastically that the current number of Blue Bird babies which have flown from the nesting boxes (45), now equals that total number of babies which flew from the nests during the entire 2008 Season. And, there are still 8 babies in the nesting boxes, as well as three new nests.

It will be interesting to see how long the 2009 Blue Bird mating season lasts, here on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

Here are Survey Totals this 2009 Season so far:

First Clutch Totals:
33 eggs laid total, 5 of which were sterile.
28 Blue Bird babies flew the nest.

Second Clutch Totals (so far):
36 eggs laid total, 3 of which were lost to a predator.
6 eggs in nesting boxes currently. – Last Week: 6 eggs in nesting boxes.
8 babies in nesting boxes currently. – Last Week: 22 babies in nesting boxes.
17 Blue Bird babies flew the nest. – Last Week: 3 babies had flown the nest.

Third Clutch Totals (so far):
1 egg laid
3 nesting boxes have new nests in them.

2009 Season Totals (so far):

70 eggs laid: 5 have been sterile, 3 lost to a predator. – Last Week: 69 eggs. Last Year: 73 eggs laid, 12 sterile, 5 lost to predators, as of Week #16.

45 babies have flown the nest. – Last Week: 31 babies. Last Year: 33 babies had flown the nest as of Week #16.

7 eggs in nesting boxes currently. – Last Week: 7 eggs.

6 babies in nesting boxes currently. – Last Week: 22 babies.

Here are the results of Friday’s Blue Bird Trail Survey – June 19, 2009:

Nesting Box #1 – 3 Blue Bird babies, 1 Blue Bird egg. – Last Week: 3 Blue Bird babies, 1 Blue Bird egg.

Nesting Box #2 – 2 large Blue Bird babies, 3 Blue Bird eggs. – Last Week: 2 Blue Bird babies, 3 Blue Bird eggs.

Nesting Box #3 – Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #4 – 4 Blue Bird babies flew the nest, removed old nest, cleaned. – Last Week: 4 Blue Bird babies.

Nesting Box #5 – Empty box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty box, no activity.

Nesting Box #6 – 3 Blue Bird babies, 1 Blue Bird egg. – Last Week: 3 Blue Bird babies, 1 Blue Bird egg.

Nesting Box #7 – New nest built, 1 egg – Third Clutch. – Last Week: 3 Blue Bird babies flew from the nest, 1 Blue Bird egg.

Nesting Box #8 – New nest built – Third Clutch. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #9 – Empty box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty box, no activity.

Nesting Box #10 – Empty box, no activity. – Last Week: Empty box, no activity.

Nesting Box #11 – 5 Large Blue Bird babies flew the nest, removed nest, cleaned box. – Last Week: 5 Large Blue Bird babies.

Nesting Box #12 – New nest built – Third Clutch. – Last Week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Nesting Box #13 – 5 Large Blue Bird babies flew the nest, removed nest, cleaned box. – Last Week: 5 Large Blue Bird babies.

Have a great week!

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IKE.

Hurricane IKE.

Probably not since the days of World War II and the 1950s in American politics, has this famous nickname drawn such acute attention from the American people.

Born in Texas, Dwight David Eisenhower rose to prominence during WW-II to become the General of the Army and Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe, and presided over the defeat of German forces in that theater of the war.

In 1952, “IKE” was elected the 34th President of the United States, and then was re-elected in 1956.

Eisenhower “Ike” and his wife, Mamie, retired to a Pennsylvania farm adjacent to where the pivotal battle of the American Civil War was fought on July 2, 3 & 4, 1863, at Gettysburg.

Now, the “IKE” nickname is again prominently in the news, this time as a Category 4 Hurricane, on track to ravage the entire east coast of Cuba, and then become the second hurricane in the past two weeks to enter the Gulf of Mexico and threaten the Gulf Coast of the United States.

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As is usual at this stage of the hurricane’s progress west, it is too early to tell where the eye of IKE may make landfall. As the computer models above illustrate, IKE could go several directions, including towards the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Most of the models have tracks moving towards the Texas coastline.

Here at the Center, we stand ready to implement client evacuation plans again, if IKE heads this way. Much of the cleanup of debris from Hurricane Gustav has been accomplished. And, the two shrimp boats deposited on Shaggy’s entrance road in the Pass Christian harbor, have been removed and Shaggy’s is open for business again.

Locally, some houses remain that have their windows still boarded over, although most businesses have removed their boards, and put them back into storage until next time.

Once IKE leaves Cuba and enters the Gulf, its track will be more positively defined, and perhaps we will have a better idea if it is, in fact, headed in our direction.

Until then, we continue to anxiously wait. And watch the Weather Channel. And check the models at the National Hurricane Center and WeatherUnderground.

With more folks around here starting to exhibit signs of a bit of Hurricane Fatigue, as well as some unpleasant flashback memories of Hurricane Katrina, the next few days of waiting will not be easy ones.

IKE, we loved and respected where your name came from, but we don’t like who you are now.

GO AWAY!

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Ok, Blue Bird fans, we’re near the end of the Blue Bird mating season here, and it’s Week #20 update time for the Mississippi Gulf Coast Blue Bird Program in the city of Long Beach, on the 45-acre campus of the South Mississippi Regional Center!

Here is what ‘Master Naturalist’ buddy John and I found today, July 18, 2008, walking around campus during a Friday morning, taking the Blue Bird Trail nesting survey.

Here are this week’s Survey results:

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Master Naturalist Buddy John checks one of the SMRC Blue Bird Trail nesting boxes Friday morning during the weekly survey.

Box #1- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #2- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: 3 Blue Bird babies flew from the nest.

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Nesting box #12 has 5 fast-growing “bauble-heads,” as Master Naturalist Buddy John calls the Blue Bird babies. These guys will be flying the nest before the survey next Friday.

Box #3- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #4- 1 Blue Bird baby flew the nest. – Last week: 1 Blue Bird baby, 3 sterile Blue Bird eggs.

Box #5- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #6- 1 Blue Bird egg missing, 3 sterile Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 4 Blue Bird eggs.

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The juvenile Killdeers are still growing and almost the size of the adult parents.

Box #7- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #8- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #9- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

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The second juvenile Killdeer.

Box #10- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #11- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Few old straw, no new activity.

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An adult Mockingbird alertly guards her nest in one of the trees on the SMRC Campus.

Box #12- 5 large Blue Bird babies. – Last week: 5 new Blue Bird babies.

Box #13- Empty Nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Totals This Week: 5 Blue Bird babies, 1 Blue Bird baby flew the nest, 1 Blue Bird egg missing (predator), 6 sterile Blue Bird eggs, 10 empty nesting boxes.

Totals Last Week: 4 Blue Bird eggs, 6 Blue Bird babies, 9 Empty nesting boxes, 3 Blue Birds flew from the nest, 2 Killdeer babies (one baby and one parent have disappeared, perhaps to a nearby area).

Master Naturalist buddy John continues to be very enthused about the activity, and reports that during the last 19 weeks of the program, 40 Blue Bird babies and 6 Chickadee babies have flown from their nests, and we also have 2 of the original 3 Killdeer babies left who have left their ground nest in one of the grassy areas on campus, and have joined their parents in feeding on the ground, during this first season of the new Blue Bird Trail.

The weather today was partly cloudy, light wind, humid and about 93 degrees.

Another update will be along next weekend. Have a great Weekend!

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Here are the results from the Wild Flower identification contest in last week’s survey results:

Wild Flower #1 – below: Common Name: Orange Milkwort, Orange Candy Root.

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Here’s a closer view of Wild Flower #1 – below: Orange Milkwort, Orange Candy Root.

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Wild Flower #2 – below: *Note: This flower starts out as a purple color and fades to the white it is here. Common Name: Meadow Beauty.

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Wild Flower #3: Common Name: Spiderwort.

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Wild Flower #4 – below: Common Name: Rose Purslane.

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Here is a closer view of Wild Flower #4 – below: Common Name: Rose Purslane.

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Here is Wild Flower #5 – below: Name: Threadleaf Coreopsis.

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Congratulations to Carissa at Good and Crazy for having the most correct wild flower names!

Thanks to those of you who ventured guesses on the names!

Another Survey next week!

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Ok, Blue Bird fans, we’re near the end of the Blue Bird mating season here, and it’s Week #19 update time for the Mississippi Gulf Coast Blue Bird Program in the city of Long Beach, on the 45-acre campus of the South Mississippi Regional Center!

Here is what ‘Master Naturalist’ buddy John and I found today, July 11, 2008, walking around campus during a Friday morning, taking the Blue Bird Trail nesting survey.

Here are this week’s Survey results:

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Emily The Tree-Climbing Wonder Dog, always goes on the Survey Walk.

Box #1- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #2- 3 Blue Bird babies flew from the nest. – Last week: 3 Blue Bird babies.

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The Blue Bird baby in nesting box #4 has grown very large and should be flying from the nest before next week’s Survey. Unfortunaely, it appears the three eggs in the nest with him/her are sterile.

Box #3- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #4- 1 Blue Bird baby, 3 sterile Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 1 Blue Bird baby, 3 Blue Bird eggs

Box #5- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #6- 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 3 Blue Bird eggs.

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Five new babies in nesting box #12 since last week!

Box #7- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #8- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #9- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

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The Killdeer babies continue to grow.

Box #10- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #11- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Few old straw, no new activity.

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A number of beautiful wild flowers also grow along the Blue Bird Trail on our Campus, including many Trumpet Vine flowers.

Box #12- 5 new Blue Bird babies. – Last week: 5 Blue Bird eggs.

Box #13- Empty Nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

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Another Trumpet Vine flower, this one has a visitor.

Totals This Week: 4 Blue Bird eggs, 6 Blue Bird babies, 9 Empty nesting boxes, 3 Blue Birds flew from the nest, 2 Killdeer babies (one baby and one parent have disappeared, perhaps to a nearby area).

Totals Last Week: 11 Blue Bird eggs, 4 Blue Bird babies, 9 Empty nesting boxes, 3 Killdeer babies.

Master Naturalist buddy John continues to be very enthused about the activity, and reports that during the last 18 weeks of the program, 39 Blue Bird babies and 6 Chickadee babies have flown from their nests, and we also have 2 of the original 3 Killdeer babies left who have left their ground nest in one of the grassy areas on campus, and have joined their parents in feeding on the ground, during this first season of the new Blue Bird Trail. We are hoping to have at least 50 Blue Bird babies fly from the nests this season, but the season is near the end, and we feel it will probably be over in the next 2-3 weeks.

The weather today was partly cloudy, light wind, humid and about 93 degrees.

Another update will be along next weekend. Have a great Weekend!

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Meanwhile, we thought we would have a little Wild Flower contest.

Please have a look at the following wild flowers which were in bloom this morning along the Blue Bird Trail and see if you know their names: (Winners and names will be announced in next week’s Survey)

Wild Flower #1 – below:

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Here’s a closer view of Wild Flower #1 – below:

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Wild Flower #2 – below: *Note: This flower starts out as a purple color and fades to the white it is here.

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Wild Flower #3:

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Wild Flower #4 – below:

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Here is a closer view of Wild Flower #4 – below:

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Here is Wild Flower #5 – below:

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Good luck on coming up with the names of these beautiful wild flowers!

Another Survey next week!

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Ok, Blue Bird fans, it’s Week #17 update time for the Mississippi Gulf Coast Blue Bird Program in the city of Long Beach, on the 45-acre campus of the South Mississippi Regional Center!

So, here is what ‘Master Naturalist’ buddy John and I found today, June 27, 2008, walking around campus during a Friday morning, taking the Blue Bird Trail nesting survey.

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There are dozens of gray squirrels on the SMRC Campus.

Here are this week’s Survey results:

Box #1- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #2- 3 Blue Bird babies. – Last week: 3 Blue Bird babies, 2 Blue Bird eggs.

Box #3- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

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Another campus gray squirrel.

Box #4- 4 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: 5 Blue Bird eggs.

Box #5- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #6- 3 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: New Blue Bird nest, 1 Blue Bird egg.

Box #7- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: 4 Blue Bird babies flew the nest on Friday afternoon.

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The Killdeer babies on the campus have really grown during the past week, and almost look like their parents now.

Box #8- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #9- 4 Blue Bird babies flew the nest. – Last week: 4 Blue Bird babies.

Box #10- Empty nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

Box #11- Few old straw. – Last week: Few straw, no activity.

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One of the Killdeer parents is always near the babies.

Box #12- 5 Blue Bird eggs. – Last week: e Blue Bird eggs.

Box #13- Empty Nesting box, no activity. – Last week: Empty nesting box, no activity.

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During the past several days, ‘pop-up’ thunderstorms have been very common on the Mississippi Gulf Coast area, and yesterday, provided a very heavy rain storm over the SMRC Campus.

Totals This Week: 12 Blue Bird eggs, 3 Blue Bird babies, 4 Blue Bird babies flew the nest, 0 sterile eggs,
7 empty nesting boxes, 3 Killdeer babies.

Totals Last Week: 12 Blue Bird eggs, 7 Blue Bird babies, 0 Sterile eggs, 7 empty nesting boxes, 4 Blue Bird babies flew the nest, 3 Killdeer babies.

Master Naturalist buddy John continues to be very enthused about the activity, and reports that during the last 17 weeks of the program, 36 Blue Bird babies and 6 Chickadee babies have flown from their nests, and we also have 3 Killdeer babies who have left their ground nest in one of the grassy areas on campus, and have joined their parents in feeding on the ground, during this first season of the new Blue Bird Trail.

The weather today was partly cloudy, light wind and about 88 degrees.

Another update will be along next weekend.

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